Romeo And Juliet Essay Conflict And Violence

Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work.

The Forcefulness of Love

Romeo and Julietis the most famous love story in the English literary tradition. Love is naturally the play’s dominant and most important theme. The play focuses on romantic love, specifically the intense passion that springs up at first sight between Romeo and Juliet. In Romeo and Juliet, love is a violent, ecstatic, overpowering force that supersedes all other values, loyalties, and emotions. In the course of the play, the young lovers are driven to defy their entire social world: families (“Deny thy father and refuse thy name,” Juliet asks, “Or if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love, / And I’ll no longer be a Capulet”); friends (Romeo abandons Mercutio and Benvolio after the feast in order to go to Juliet’s garden); and ruler (Romeo returns to Verona for Juliet’s sake after being exiled by the Prince on pain of death in 2.1.76–78). Love is the overriding theme of the play, but a reader should always remember that Shakespeare is uninterested in portraying a prettied-up, dainty version of the emotion, the kind that bad poets write about, and whose bad poetry Romeo reads while pining for Rosaline. Love in Romeo and Juliet is a brutal, powerful emotion that captures individuals and catapults them against their world, and, at times, against themselves.

The powerful nature of love can be seen in the way it is described, or, more accurately, the way descriptions of it so consistently fail to capture its entirety. At times love is described in the terms of religion, as in the fourteen lines when Romeo and Juliet first meet. At others it is described as a sort of magic: “Alike bewitchèd by the charm of looks” (2.Prologue.6). Juliet, perhaps, most perfectly describes her love for Romeo by refusing to describe it: “But my true love is grown to such excess / I cannot sum up some of half my wealth” (3.1.33–34). Love, in other words, resists any single metaphor because it is too powerful to be so easily contained or understood.

Romeo and Juliet does not make a specific moral statement about the relationships between love and society, religion, and family; rather, it portrays the chaos and passion of being in love, combining images of love, violence, death, religion, and family in an impressionistic rush leading to the play’s tragic conclusion.

Love as a Cause of Violence

The themes of death and violence permeate Romeo and Juliet, and they are always connected to passion, whether that passion is love or hate. The connection between hate, violence, and death seems obvious. But the connection between love and violence requires further investigation.

Love, in Romeo and Juliet, is a grand passion, and as such it is blinding; it can overwhelm a person as powerfully and completely as hate can. The passionate love between Romeo and Juliet is linked from the moment of its inception with death: Tybalt notices that Romeo has crashed the feast and determines to kill him just as Romeo catches sight of Juliet and falls instantly in love with her. From that point on, love seems to push the lovers closer to love and violence, not farther from it. Romeo and Juliet are plagued with thoughts of suicide, and a willingness to experience it: in Act 3, scene 3, Romeo brandishes a knife in Friar Lawrence’s cell and threatens to kill himself after he has been banished from Verona and his love. Juliet also pulls a knife in order to take her own life in Friar Lawrence’s presence just three scenes later. After Capulet decides that Juliet will marry Paris, Juliet says, “If all else fail, myself have power to die” (3.5.242). Finally, each imagines that the other looks dead the morning after their first, and only, sexual experience (“Methinks I see thee,” Juliet says, “. . . as one dead in the bottom of a tomb” (3.5.55–56). This theme continues until its inevitable conclusion: double suicide. This tragic choice is the highest, most potent expression of love that Romeo and Juliet can make. It is only through death that they can preserve their love, and their love is so profound that they are willing to end their lives in its defense. In the play, love emerges as an amoral thing, leading as much to destruction as to happiness. But in its extreme passion, the love that Romeo and Juliet experience also appears so exquisitely beautiful that few would want, or be able, to resist its power.

Shakespeare's tips for breaking up with someone

The Individual Versus Society

Much of Romeo and Juliet involves the lovers’ struggles against public and social institutions that either explicitly or implicitly oppose the existence of their love. Such structures range from the concrete to the abstract: families and the placement of familial power in the father; law and the desire for public order; religion; and the social importance placed on masculine honor. These institutions often come into conflict with each other. The importance of honor, for example, time and again results in brawls that disturb the public peace.

More main ideas from Romeo and Juliet

Violence And Conflict In 'romeo And Juliet' By William Shakespeare

Violence and Conflict in 'Romeo and Juliet' by William Shakespeare

In any play by the well-known William Shakespeare, there is bound to
be plenty of meat on the bone in regards to the script. Underneath
the concrete elements of character, plot and theme there are very
complex and unique ideas and images. Throughout one of Shakespeare's
more established plays, Romeo and Juliet, many images are evoked
through the playwright's mastery--one of the key ones being the
violence that envelopes the world of Verona. Shakespeare produces
fantastic visions of violence in the world, through what happens in
the play. A few main violent images brought about by the work is that
it is unfair, universal, and overpowering, yet it also ultimately
serves as a sense of hope and rebirth.

In Verona, the feud between the Capulets and Montagues reigns supreme,
and rules seemingly over love, over justice, in an almost unfair
manner, as "civil blood makes civil hands unclean". The image of
violence being so unfair exists prominently in the deaths of so many
of the cast. We see the two obvious images of the tragic death
brought on by violence, in the two lovers Romeo and Juliet. Their
young, pure lives are brought to a despicable end through the violence
around them. Had this whole bloody feud between the Capulets and
Montagues never of been so great, then they would have been able to
marry in peace and happiness, instead of doing all that they could,
but only to end up dead together in Juliet's tomb. Quite an unfair
notion. This image along with the death of Romeo's friend Mercutio
helps to convey the idea that violence is an unfair, powerful aspect
of their world. When Romeo convinces Mercutio to not confront Tybalt,
then Mercutio pays the price with his death--an ambush from his sly
opponent. Therefore, what seemed as a positive outcome turns into a
great loss for both sides of the feud, which comes across as unfair to
whomever looks upon the situation. Then to take revenge upon Tybalt,
Romeo runs him through and slays him--to only avenge his friend.
Afterward, he is banished from the city for that deed, even though it
was Tybalt who had started the whole quarrel. What's done is done,
yet Romeo has suffered greatly from something that was not entirely
his fault. These instances all show how violence is shown as a very
unfair image, and a very rotten one at that.

Aside from that idea, violence is also portrayed as universal. In the
very first scene of the play, there is a barroom brawl type of event,
in which lowly peasants and soldiers get into a quarrel. This whole
fight starts from a mere mentioning of a few words, which sets off a
large reaction between the characters, ending in a large collision.
As said by Samson, "a dog of the house of Montague moves me". To
portray the image...

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