Essay Romeo And Juliet Act 1 Scene 5

“Romeo and Juliet”: Act 1 Scene 5

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In William Shakespeare’s play Capulet. This adds to the scene being so dramatically effective as do other happenings throughout the length of the scene. These include the speech of Capulet and the happy and joyous mood of the party, The romantic speech of Romeo, The hatred and harshness of Tybalt’s speech, a direct contrast with that of Romeo’s and the drama when the two lovers, Romeo and Juliet first meet.

The scene is central to the plot because it sets up a chain of events leading to a tragic end and wide spread confusion. At the start of Act 1 scene 5, Capulet turns to the maskers at the ball and delivers a speech rather jokingly tell all to enjoy the night and dance to the music. This speech is important as it lets the Audience know and that this night is a happy and joyous occasion. As a reader or observer you feel Capulet is happy, because the event is just for Capulet’s.

He and the others feel only happy when they’re with their own kind, this adds to the dramatic effectiveness of the scene because as an audience member you are now even more aware of the great tension that is waiting to explode between the houses of Capulet and Montague. This joyous occasion is also of stark contrast to the fighting at the beginning of the play. More important speeches are made including that of Romeo. Shakespeare uses Romeo’s romantic speech, this make the scene dramatic because it intensifies the mood threefold after the happy and joking speech made by Capulet.

Romeo’s speech identifies to the audience for the first time, how Romeo feels about Juliet. That Juliet’s beauty is unmatched by those in the room and that Romeo has never loved before but he now thinks he has found her, Juliet the one. At this point the audience realises just what type of love and passion Romeo feels for Juliet. This event adds much more dramatic effect and intensifies the scene. At this instant a height of drama is achieved, but Shakespeare lifts it higher with a stronger and more hating speech, that of Tybalt’s.

Shakespeare creates effective drama by introducing the speech of Juliet’s cousin, Tybalt. Tybalt’s speech is strong and hateful towards Romeo, as he is now aware that there is one, if not more Montague’s present. By using dialogue such as ‘what dare that slave come hither’ and ‘uncle, this is a Montague, our foe’ Shakespeare is able to translate the hate and rivalry, possessed between Romeo and Tybalt’s and generally the drama and conflict between Capulet and Montague. This is very dramatically effective.

Capulet’s response to Tybalt, is to say that he has heard only good things about Romeo, therefore the party must go on. More time for more drama is allowed with no interruption of the party, therefore the passionate meeting of Romeo and Juliet is allowed to take place. Shakespeare creates more effective drama by scripting the first words, followed then by a kiss, between Romeo and Juliet. Romeo first suggests that he is unworthy of Juliet’s beauty and that to kiss would be a minor sin.

By using passionate dialogue, Shakespeare is able to once again express the feelings of Romeo towards Juliet. This once again shows the audience that to kiss Juliet, would mean no greater thing in the world to Romeo. The dramatic effect of this kiss is heightened, because of what it now means in the context of their lives and also the play. Drama is effectively used, to translate to the audience that this is one of the most important incidents and scenes of the play. In conclusion I say that as one of if not the most important scenes in the play, Act 1 scene 5 is very dramatically effective.

It is so because Shakespeare used Capulet’s speech to set a contrasting happy mood to that of the beginning of the play, so already this scene was different. Shakespeare expressed Romeo’s declaration of his love for Juliet to intensify the mood threefold. Then Tybalt’s speech was used to resurrect the hatred and conflict between Capulet and Montague also to use the key them of hate. Finally Shakespeare added the kiss of Romeo and Juliet, to heighten the drama and passion but also to represent a key theme, that of love.

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These two themes love and hate exist not only throughout the play but also throughout the world and time that is why the play is so popular because billions can relate to love and hate. It has also inspired many films, books and plays after its time. In finishing I now say that this scene is Dramatic in many ways and that with this finely tuned drama, I believe it’s the most important scene of the play. As the very effectiveness of the drama, sets the scene for the rest of the tale about fair Juliet and her Romeo.

Author: Brandon Johnson

in Romeo and Juliet

“Romeo and Juliet”: Act 1 Scene 5

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Summary: Act 1, scene 5

In the great hall of the Capulets, all is a-bustle. The servants work feverishly to make sure all runs smoothly, and set aside some food to make sure they have some enjoyment of the feast as well. Capulet makes his rounds through groups of guests, joking with them and encouraging all to dance.

From across the room, Romeo sees Juliet, and asks a servingman who she is. The servingman does not know. Romeo is transfixed; Rosaline vanishes from his mind and he declares that he has never been in love until this moment. Moving through the crowd, Tybalt hears and recognizes Romeo’s voice. Realizing that there is a Montague present, Tybalt sends a servant to fetch his rapier. Capulet overhears Tybalt and reprimands him, telling him that Romeo is well regarded in Verona, and that he will not have the youth harmed at his feast. Tybalt protests, but Capulet scolds him until he agrees to keep the peace. As Capulet moves on, Tybalt vows that he will not let this indignity pass.

Meanwhile, Romeo has approached Juliet and touched her hand. In a dialogue laced with religious metaphors that figure Juliet as a saint and Romeo as a pilgrim who wishes to erase his sin, he tries to convince her to kiss him, since it is only through her kiss that he might be absolved. Juliet agrees to remain still as Romeo kisses her. Thus, in the terms of their conversation, she takes his sin from him. Juliet then makes the logical leap that if she has taken Romeo’s sin from him, his sin must now reside in her lips, and so they must kiss again.

Just as their second kiss ends, the Nurse arrives and tells Juliet that her mother wants to speak with her. Romeo asks the Nurse who Juliet’s mother is. The Nurse replies that Lady Capulet is her mother. Romeo is devastated. As the crowd begins to disperse, Benvolio shows up and leads Romeo from the feast. Juliet is just as struck with the mysterious man she has kissed as Romeo is with her. She comments to herself that if he is already married, she feels she will die (1.5.131). In order to find out Romeo’s identity without raising any suspicions, she asks the Nurse to identify a series of young men. The Nurse goes off and returns with the news that the man’s name is Romeo, and that he is a Montague. Overcome with anguish that she loves a Montague, Juliet follows her nurse from the hall.

Read a translation of Act 1, scene 5 →

Analysis

This is the moment we’ve all been waiting for. Romeo sees Juliet and forgets Rosaline entirely; Juliet meets Romeo and falls just as deeply in love. The meeting of Romeo and Juliet dominates the scene, and, with extraordinary language that captures both the excitement and wonder that the two protagonists feel, Shakespeare proves equal to the expectations he has set up by delaying the meeting for an entire act.

The tragic love story of Romeo and Juliet... told in text messages

The first conversation between Romeo and Juliet is an extended Christian metaphor. Using this metaphor, Romeo ingeniously manages to convince Juliet to let him kiss her. But the metaphor holds many further functions. The religious overtones of the conversation clearly imply that their love can be described only through the vocabulary of religion, that pure association with God. In this way, their love becomes associated with the purity and passion of the divine. But there is another side to this association of personal love and religion. In using religious language to describe their burgeoning feelings for each other, Romeo and Juliet tiptoe on the edge of blasphemy. Romeo compares Juliet to an image of a saint that should be revered, a role that Juliet is willing to play. Whereas the Catholic church held that reverence for saint’s images was acceptable, the Anglican church of Elizabethan times saw it as blasphemy, a kind of idol worship. Romeo’s statements about Juliet border on the heretical. Juliet commits an even more profound blasphemy in the next scene when she calls Romeo the “god of her idolatry,” effectively installing Romeo in God’s place in her personal religion (2.1.156). We have discussed already how Romeo and Juliet’s love seems always to be opposed by the social structures of family, honor, and the civil desire for order. Here it is also shown to have some conflict, at least theologically, with religion.

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